Benjamin Schaper
University of Oxford
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Gerd Hammer
University of Lisbon
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Preface
Dedalus 24 (2020), pp. 13-17.

The present issue of DEDALUS contains lectures that were given at the international colloquium “Loneliness” in the Philosophical Faculty of the University of Lisbon on February 13th and 14th, 2020. The event was organized by the group Aesthetics of Memory and Emotions of the Center for Comparative Studies at the University of Lisbon in collaboration with Benjamin Schaper from the University of Oxford.
Carmen Sousa Pardo
Universidad de Granada
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Images of the soul: loneliness as a pictorial object during the Romantic period
Dedalus 24 (2020), pp. 207-218.

Abstract
Loneliness as an iconographic topic has been widely represented throughout the History of Western Art. Due to its incorporeal character, its pictorial sensitization was carried out through religious iconography or through its allegory until the 19th century.
Although these iconographies remained, their representation acquires a more personal character from the Romanticism. The subjectivity with which the subject is treated must be linked to the birth of a new sensitivity. This new affective regime, associated with the development of liberal theory, above all prioritizes the individual expression: the self.
This individualism will also lead to a new conception of art for which loneliness will play an important role. Creation will be understood as the highest expression of the self, and as a result of the individual work of the solitary genius.
In view of the above, the aim of this article is to analyse what the iconographic patterns under which loneliness is represented in romantic painting are, and why this feeling becomes one of the most frequent topics of artistic modernity.
 
Keywords: loneliness, iconography, Romanticism, aesthetics, affect theory, 19th century
Stefan Lindinger
National and Kapodistrian University of Athens
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“Waldeinsamkeit” in Ludwig Tieck’s Novellas Der blonde Eckbert and Waldeinsamkeit as well as in Adalbert Stifter’s Der Hochwald
Dedalus 24 (2020), pp. 189-206.

Abstract
The neologism ‘Waldeinsamkeit’ describes a subset of loneliness which is specific for German Romanticism. The introductory part of this essay investigates the circumstances under which this new concept emerged. The detachment of loneliness from specific locations outside society and its transformation into a mindset (also) within society, which occurs in the course of the 18th century, results in this new subset which again links loneliness to the place where it occurs. The forest is no accidental location, for the German word ‘Wald’ is charged with strong cultural and ideological notions. Then, it will be analysed how ‘Waldeinsamkeit’ is established for the first time and later – after it had been used prolifically in both Romantic prose and poetry – revoked in two novellas by Ludwig Tieck, Der blonde Eckbert (1796/97) and Waldeinsamkeit (1841). In the last part, it will be discussed how Adalbert Stifter adapted and used ‘Waldeinsamkeit’ in Der Hochwald (1842/44).
 
Keywords: ‘Waldeinsamkeit’ – loneliness – forest – German Romanticism – Ludwig Tieck – Adalbert Stifter
Oliver Kohns
University of Luxembourg
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The Loneliness of the Villain: Shakespeare and Schiller
Dedalus 24 (2020), pp. 177-188.

Abstract
As my paper wants to show, loneliness is a characteristic of dramatic evil. Shakespeare’s Richard III represents the prototype of the lone villain. In the opening scene of the play, the protagonist explains his ‘villainous’ behavior with his exclusion from society. Richard’s loneliness, which is only superficially substantiated by his ugliness, fulfills several dramaturgical purposes. By being complicit with the public (via a shared enjoyment of cruelty), a perspective of an extradiegetic overcoming of his loneliness is opened. Schiller’s drama “Die Räuber” follows Shakespeare’s reflections on loneliness and villainy. Franz Moor is an intertextual successor of Richard III: He too is isolated by his greed for power. In contrast to Shakespeare’s play, however, the political setting is much smaller: Moor doesn’t fight for the English crown, but only for the annihilation of his family. In this sense, Schiller re-stages the drama of the lonely villain in the genre of bourgeois tragedy.
 
Keywords: Loneliness, Shakespeare, Schiller, villain, political philosophy, violence
Dorothea Boshoff
University of Mpumalanga
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Becoming Alien(ated): A case study examining intimacy and loneliness in The Sentients of Orion by Marianne de Pierres
Dedalus 24 (2020), pp. 163-176.

Abstract
A textual analysis of physical and emotional intimacy (both positive and negative) in the science fiction series The Sentients of Orion by Australian author Marianne de Pierres reveals a link between loneliness and character motivation, and also between a lack of intimacy and the perceived level of threat posed to humanity by different alien races. This theme could initially be perceived as coincidental, but de Pierres develops the underlying thread of loneliness and social isolation in a way that is central to the plot. The paper sets out to demonstrate that de Pierres consciously and consistently focuses on the social, emotional and physical effects that loneliness or a lack of intimacy may have on different characters. Taking the four novels of The Sentients of Orion as a case study representing contemporary science fiction, this paper further aims to show how loneliness as a social phenomenon is increasingly being integrated into and explored through this popular genre.
 
Keywords: loneliness, science fiction, Marianne de Pierres, gender